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Consultations with urban poor

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urban poor consultationIn January 2013, a team of UN staff held consultations in Da Nang and Ha Noi, as part of UN-facilitated discussions on the development agenda to be put in place after 2015.

Target group: the urban poor    
This mission focused on the urban poor. Officials from the local wards and the People’s Committee, as well as from the Women’s Union, were interviewed about their local poverty elimination programmes and policies. The UN experts then conducted in-depth interviews and group discussions with a number of households and urban poor people, including street vendors, porters, migrant workers and cleaners, to understand their living circumstances, the difficulties they face and their aspirations for the future.

A complex situation
“The consultations in Da Nang and Ha Noi showed that there are big differences between rural and urban poverty. In urban areas, while the incomes are higher they are unstable and not sufficient because living costs in the cities are also much higher. In addition, the big inflow of migrants from the countryside to urban areas makes urban poverty more complex to address. Migrants often don’t have any land, other assets or official household registration and this deprives them from accessing financial resources or basic services such as electricity, water, education and health care," Nguyen Quang, UN-Habitat Programme Manager explains.

“My family moved to Thanh Khe Tay ward four years ago, but we don’t have permanent household registration yet. That's why my family fails to qualify for poor family status, meaning that we are not eligible for various allowances nor free healthcare services”, Ms. Chuoc says.

"When I listened to dreams of the poor that we talked to, I understood that they are related to the difficulties they face in their daily lives. One of the biggest concerns expressed was having a stable job," says Nguyen Quy Binh, UN-Habitat Programme Advisor.

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