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woman_vendorA joint programme is a set of activities contained in a common work plan and related budget, involving two or more UN organizations and (sub-) national partners. The work plan and budget forms part of a joint programme document, which also details roles and responsibilities of partners in coordinating and managing the joint activities. The joint programme document is signed by all participating organizations and (sub-) national partners.

Joint programming is a key element of how the UN works at the country level. The concept of joint programming should be driven by the needs of each country situation in a way that best supports national implementation capacity while enhancing effectiveness and efficiency.

Current Joint Programmes in Viet Nam

As of June 2011, six joint programmes are operating within the overall framework of the One Planin Viet Nam:

  1. The Joint Programme on Strengthening Capacity in Socio-economic Development Planning,  Implementation and Provision of Basic Social Services in Kon Tum
  2. The Joint Programme to fight Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza
  3. The Joint Programme on Gender Equality
  4. The Joint Programme on Green Production and Trade to increase Income and Employment Opportunities for the Rural Poor
  5. The Joint Programme on Integrated Nutrition and Food Security Strategies for Children and Vulnerable Group
  6. The UN Joint Programme on HIV

 Click here to download an overview of the six joint programmes in Viet Nam, including contact information


1.  The Joint Programmes on Kon Tum 2007-2010: Addressing Disparities in the Ethnic Minority and Mountainous Regions

UN agencies in Viet Nam have long been actively involved in the development of Kon Tum, one of the poorest provinces of Viet Nam, and this joint programme provides a more coordinated and strategic response.   The main objective of joint programme is to increase the capacity of sub-national authorities in the province to better plan, budget and manage public resources.  The programme also works to demonstrate approaches and strategies to tackle the issue of disparity in the province with regard to access to quality social and protection services. With a focus on a specific geographic location in the province, the programme targets maternal and reproductive health, child health and nutrition, basic education, water and sanitation and protection services for marginalized and vulnerable groups (ethnic minority, children, youths and women). Support under this programme is directly provided to the province where the Provincial People’s Committee (PPC) provides overall leadership to the programme.

2.  The Joint Programmes to Fight Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) 2005-2010

Viet Nam has been one of the worst-affected countries by the highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) panzootic. This joint programme was established to support an integrated, multi-sectoral response to the challenge of controlling avian influenza in animals and the threat of a possible human pandemic. Since it began, the joint programme has been a key channel for the rapid mobilization of more than US$23 million in international donor support to Viet Nam’s national response.  National agencies have been provided with international technical advice and expertise, as well as resources to support key activities, including mass poultry vaccinations, public communications, and overall coordination of the national response. To date, the joint programme has proved to be a very rapid and effective way to channel international resources and provide international expertise, particularly during the period when Viet Nam was facing the highest number of poultry outbreaks and human cases of H5N1 in the world.

3. The UN-GOV Joint Programme on Gender Equality 2009-2011

This ambitious $4.5-million joint programme, now in its second year, contributes to achieving Millennium Development Goal 3 (MDG3) on gender equality and women’s empowerment.  Working across the health, education and economic sectors, and targeting in particular vulnerable women and girls, this joint programme contributes to the implementation of Viet Nam’s Law on Gender Equality and Law on Domestic Violence Prevention and Control by building the capacity of duty bearers to implement and monitor the two laws, enhancing partnerships and coordination around gender equality within and outside of the government,  and strengthening data collection for monitoring progress on gender equality.  The joint programme also supports advocacy efforts to raise awareness of the laws.


This new joint programme aims to increase income and employment opportunities for growers/collectors of raw materials for crafts, as well as grassroots handicrafts and furniture producers. The programme targets about 4,500 poor farming and crafts-producing households in four northern provinces of Viet Nam: Thanh Hoa, Nghe An, Hoa Binh and Phu Tho. These provinces were selected due to: (i) the high incidence of poverty, especially among ethnic minorities; (ii) the concentration of raw materials and local production of crafts; and (iii) the possibility of building synergies with past and ongoing development activities. Within the four targeted provinces, the programme will focus on the following five value chains: (i) bamboo/rattan; (ii) sericulture and weaving; (iii) sea grass; (iv) lacquerware; and (v) handmade paper. The joint programme’s approach is to develop better integrated, pro-poor, and environmentally sustainable “green” value chains, enabling poor growers, collectors and producers to improve their products and link them to more profitable markets.


Through this programme, the UN supports the Government in addressing the continuing prevalence of malnutrition among the most vulnerable, with a focus on reducing stunting and preventing future malnutrition. It does this through improving the monitoring of food security, nutrition and health; improving the capacity to deliver critical health and nutrition services, including the appropriate care of the sick and malnourished, improved infant and young child feeding and the promotion of breastfeeding, and ensuring adequate intakes of iron, vitamin A and iodine, including supplementation and salt iodization; and improving food security by increasing homestead food production and linking it to the increased consumption of a variety of safe, quality food. The programme targets a group of selected provinces with high levels of stunting (prevalence rates and numbers), including Cao Bang, Dien Bien Dak Lak, Kon Tum, Ninh Thuan, and An Giang.


The UN Joint Programme on HIV is different from those described above in that it stems from a global level commitment to bring together the efforts and resources of the UN organizations in the AIDS response to support Viet Nam in achieving Universal Access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support. As a multi-sectoral issue, HIV requires a multi-faceted response, and through this joint programme, UN organizations now work more effectively together and with the Government, capitalizing on their collective comparative advantage. The UN joint programme in Viet Nam provides a coherent strategy and action plan to support Viet Nam in addressing the challenges and opportunities in the national response to HIV. Through the joint programme, which was developed and is implemented in partnership with government ministries, civil society and other national and international partners, the UN HIV PCG  takes decisions on technical issues; implements mechanisms for monitoring of activities; liaises with relevant government ministries and bilateral donors; and integrates its reporting on progress with implementation of the programme into the One UN.

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