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Evaluation of Child Injury Prevention Interventions in Viet Nam

Date added: 11/30/2011
Downloads: 10521
Evaluation of Child Injury Prevention Interventions in Viet Nam

Child injuries remain a growing public health problem and injuries are now acknowledged as one of the leading contributors to the global burden of disease. The evidence suggests that the burden of injury on children is unequal, with the greatest burden amongst the poor and in developing and middle income countries, compared with high income countries. These countries are where most of the world’s children live. In these countries children are exposed to considerable risk from hazards in all environments.

Child Poverty in East Asia and the Pacific: Deprivations and Disparities - A Study of Seven Countrie

Date added: 11/30/2011
Downloads: 11420
Child Poverty in East Asia and the Pacific: Deprivations and Disparities - A Study of Seven Countrie

Poverty reduction begins with children. A child’s experience of poverty is very different from that of an adult. Income is but one dimension among many that should be assessed when analyzing child poverty and disparity. Non-monetary deprivation in dimensions such as shelter, food, water, sanitation, education, health, and information is equally, if not more, revealing. Since deprivation along these dimensions can have significant negative consequences on a child’s development and future, an examination of multidimensional child poverty and associated disparities is clearly warranted.

As part of UNICEF’s Global Study on Child Poverty and Disparities, several countries in East Asia and the Pacific have undertaken national child poverty and disparity studies. In this paper, results from seven of those countries, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Mongolia, the Philippines, Thailand, Vanuatu and Viet Nam, are reviewed. The objective is to identify trends and lessons, generate strategies for UNICEF EAPRO, and to contribute toward a richer conceptualization of the situation of children in the region.

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Making Social Audit work for Viet Nam: Key Findings and Lessons Learned from a Pilot of Four Social

Date added: 11/22/2011
Downloads: 12675
Making Social Audit work for Viet Nam: Key Findings and Lessons Learned from a Pilot of Four Social

A pilot involving four social audit tools was implemented in Viet Nam in 2010. Led by the Ministry of Planning and Investment (MPI), and supported by UNICEF, it aimed at building capacity for the social audit of the Socio-Economic Development Plan (SEDP) to enhance the its social performance, as expressed in its ability to deliver continued improvement in the living standards of Viet Nam’s population in general and of vulnerable groups in particular. This focus was on achieving this through improved Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) of social dimensions of the 2006-2010 SEDP, particularly focusing on poverty reduction, health services for children under six years old, and gender.

The Central Institute for Economic Management (CIEM), under the authority of MPI, implemented the pilots with technical support of the UK-based Overseas Development Institute (ODI). CIEM also conducted a capacity assessment of government staff in using participatory methods for planning, monitoring and evaluation. Based on this and the lessons learned from the social audit pilots, a capacity development strategy has been developed. ODI has also developed a SEDP Social Audit Toolkit with detailed information on the four tools, based on the experience gained from piloting the tools in the Vietnamese context.

This report should be of interest to national and sub-national government officials in Viet Nam who are in charge of designing, implementing, monitoring and evaluating public policies, programs and services. It should also be of interest to UNICEF and other multilateral and donor agencies that assist the government of Viet Nam in meeting its development objectives, and interested in methods/tools that allow for greater participation of citizens in assessing public policies and programs.

Provincial Profiles for Dien Bien, Kon Tum, Ninh Thuan, Dong Thap, An Giang, HCMC, Gia Lai, Lao Cai

Date added: 09/27/2011
Downloads: 10429
Provincial Profiles for Dien Bien, Kon Tum, Ninh Thuan, Dong Thap, An Giang, HCMC, Gia Lai, Lao Cai

The set of provincial profiles was developed to facilitate the sub-national planning and programming process by UNICEF and the Government of Viet Nam for the next Country Programme cycle 2012-2016. It contains a total of eight statistical profiles representing the eight provinces that, after an extensive analytical selection process, were identified as representing the sub-national geographical focus for the coming five years, notably: Dien Bien, Kon Tum, Ninh Thuan, Dong Thap, An Giang, Ho Chi Minh City, Gia Lai and Lao Cai.

 

Each profile contains key demographic and socio-economic data by province, a provincial map with districts and its relative position on the map of Vietnam, a box on key emerging issues by province, as well as a column on national averages for comparison purposes. The main data source used is the 2009 Census, and efforts were made to disaggregate data in keeping with the equity focus. In addition to informing the sub-national planning and programming processes, the statistical profiles double as a baseline for monitoring purposes and as a fundraising tool for the next country programme cycle.

 

The eight focal provinces were selected based on a number of criteria, the most important of which being the depth and number of deprivations among children in a given province. Deprivation is measured based on a number of key social indicators (reflected in the profiles), including child mortality; stunting; net enrolment; and use of safe drinking water and sanitation, among others. Other considerations include: continuity and existing partnerships with provincial authorities, UNICEF and counterpart capacity, presence of partners, UNICEF added value, and regional balance.

A Review of the Nutrition Situation in Viet Nam 2009-2010

Date added: 07/12/2011
Downloads: 13138
A Review of the Nutrition Situation in Viet Nam 2009-2010

Although Viet Nam has achieved significant results in improving children’s health and nutritional status over the past decades, addressing malnutrition – and stunting in particular – remains an unfinished agenda. A Review of the Nutrition Situation in Viet Nam in 2009-2010, prepared jointly by the National Institute of Nutrition and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), focuses on the nutritional status of children under five years and their mothers, especially on the prevalence of malnutrition among the preschool population, and the data on micronutrient deficiencies. It also includes data on some of the underlying and basic factors such as food consumption and poverty.

The Nutrition Situation in Viet Nam shows that about 29 per cent of preschool aged children are stunted and 17.5 per cent of children under five are underweight. In addition, a number of nutrition-related chronic diseases such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes and cardio-vascular diseases are increasing rapidly, creating a double burden of malnutrition in Viet Nam.

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Spotlight

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Harsh punishment for child offenders doesn’t prevent further criminality

The age at which a child, can be held criminally liable is a controversial issue around the world. Within Viet Nam, this issue is currently being grappled with in the Penal Code amendments. Some argue that a "get tough on crime" approach is necessary to punish children to prevent further criminality.

However, international research shows that because of their developmental stages, labelling and treating children as criminals at an early age can have serious negative impacts on their development and successful rehabilitation.


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New Year Greetings from the United Nations Resident Coordinator a.i. in Viet Nam

 

On the occasion of New Year 2017, on behalf of the United Nations family in Viet Nam I wish to reiterate our appreciation and express our warmest wishes to our partners and friends throughout the country. We wish our partners and their families in Viet Nam peace, prosperity, good health and happiness in the coming year.

As we enter the second year of the Sustainable Development Goals era, we look forward to continuing our close cooperation for the sake of Viet Nam’s future development; one which is inclusive, equitable and sustainable, with no one left behind.

Youssouf Abdel-Jelil
United Nations Resident Coordinator a.i. in Viet Nam


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UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s message for World AIDS Day, observed on 1 December

 

Thirty-five years since the emergence of AIDS, the international community can look back with some pride.  But we must also look ahead with resolve and commitment to reach our goal of ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030.

There has been real progress in tackling the disease. More people than ever are on treatment.  Since 2010, the number of children infected through mother to child transmission has dropped by half. Fewer people die of AIDS related causes each year.  And people living with HIV are living longer lives.

The number of people with access to life-saving medicines has doubled over the past five years, now topping 18 million. With the right investments, the world can get on the fast-track to achieve our target of 30 million people on treatment by 2030.  Access to HIV medicines to prevent mother to child transmission is now available to more than 75 per cent of those in need.


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The secretary-general's message for the International Day to End Violence against Women and Girls

 

25 November 2016 - At long last, there is growing global recognition that violence against women and girls is a human rights violation, public health pandemic and serious obstacle to sustainable development.  Yet there is still much more we can and must do to turn this awareness into meaningful prevention and response.


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UNIDO Director General's Op-Ed Article to media on the occasion of UNIDO's 50th anniversary

 

Did you know that in Viet Nam, the net flow of foreign direct investment increased from USD1billion in 2003 to USD10 billion in 2008, and that by 2015 reached USD23 billion?  Or that the total value of exports rose from USD2 billion in 1990 to USD72 billion in 2010, to reach USD162 billion in 2015? These impressive figures highlight the country’s robust economic success, providing a boost to the economy and employment.

These accomplishments are largely due to the reforms undertaken by Viet Nam since Doi Moi in 1986 which liberalized the economy, attracted foreign investment, fostered exports and reduced poverty. To prepare for reform, Viet Nam received extensive technical assistance from the international community, including from the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), well before 1986 and, more precisely, since 1978.

For more than 35 years, UNIDO has been sharing international best practices to help Viet Nam develop inclusive and sustainable industry. With more than USD100 million in expenditure, UNIDO’s technical cooperation activities have been carried out across a broad range of fields, including support to the private sector and technical and industrial research organizations, facilitation of technology transfer, trade capacity-building, human resource development, environmental protection, energy efficiency, investment promotion and responsible business practices.



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