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Newsletter on children's issues for elected officials in Viet Nam

Date added: 04/22/2008
Downloads: 14418
Newsletter on children's issues for elected officials in Viet Nam

For the first time ever, Viet Nam has produced a Newsletter on children's issues for elected officials. The 12-page color newsletter in Vietnamese is published by Viet Nam National Assembly's Committee on Culture, Education, Youth and Children with the support of UNICEF Viet Nam. Its purpose is to provide information on issues related to children and child rights to serve elected officials from central to local levels in carrying out their legislative and oversight functions. 5,000 copies of the Newsletter are distributed free to all National Assembly's Deputies and members of People’s Councils at local levels.

The Newsletter will be produced two times a year in May and November during the two National Assembly sessions. It is expected that the newsletter will serve as an interesting and innovative way to inform decision-makers about children's issues, and to draw their attention to the priority emerging issues for children by presenting them with data, analysis and opinions in an easily accessible and digestible format. 

Click on the link below to download the document (available in Vietnamese only).  

Executive Summary of the Analysis of the Situation of Children in Viet Nam 2010

Date added: 12/21/2010
Downloads: 14026
Executive Summary of the Analysis of the Situation of Children in Viet Nam 2010

Viet Nam has achieved rapid economic success and remarkable social progress in just over two decades, reaching lower middle-income status in 2009. It is a leader in the Asia-Pacific region in having achieved almost all of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) at the national level well ahead of schedule, and it is on track to achieve the others before 2015. The country was the first in Asia, and the second in the world, to ratify the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) in 1990, and it has continued to demonstrate visible and forward-looking leadership for its approximately 30 million children (around one-third of the total population). By any measure, Viet Nam has made tremendous progress for its children in a remarkably short period of time.

Yet segments of the child and adolescent population in Viet Nam continue to live in conditions of deprivation and exclusion. For example, quality health care, secondary education and clean water are not equally accessible to all children. Social exclusion is caused by several factors including economic disparities, gender inequality, and marked differences between the rural and the more affluent urban areas, as well as between geographic regions. Ethnic minorities continue to be among the poorest and have benefited least from the country’s economic growth. Poverty still causes children to drop out of school, live in the streets, or engage in high-risk behaviour such as sex work in order to survive.

Health equity in Viet Nam a situational analysis focused on maternal and child mortality

Date added: 03/02/2010
Downloads: 13684
Health equity in Viet Nam a situational analysis focused on maternal and child mortality

Background paper prepared for unicef consultancy on "Equity in access to quality healthcare for women and children" (april 8-10, ha long city, Viet Nam)

This situational analysis provides estimates of the degree of inequality in both maternal and child mortality and other high-level maternal and child health outcomes causally related to maternal and child mortality, including child morbidity, children's nutritional status and fertility. Estimates are also provided for several key intermediate health outcomes causally related to maternal and child mortality, including family planning, antenatal care, obstetric delivery care, immunization and curative care. Both early estimates for 1992/93 and recent estimates for 2006 of inequality are presented and compared. The main data sources used in the situational analysis include three household surveys, i.e., the 1992/93 Vietnam Living Standards Survey (VLSS), the 2006 MICS III and the 2006 Viet Nam Household Living Standards Survey (VHLSS), and provincelevel data from the MOH Health Information System (HIS) and other sources. In addition to inequality estimates, the situational analysis presents the results of regression analysis used to identify the underlying factors, such as age, sex, education, income, urbanization and ethnicity that are most closely associated with these outcomes. The observed inequalities are also decomposed in order to quantify the contributions made by the various underlying factors to the observed inequality.

Summary: National Survey on Sanitation and Hygiene in Viet Nam

Date added: 03/24/2008
Downloads: 13665
Summary: National Survey on Sanitation and Hygiene in Viet Nam

Viet Nam has made significant progress over the past decades in providing rural population with safe water supply and sanitation facilities. Nevertheless, the progress with sanitation and hygiene has been less impressive with concerns for the quality and use of household, school and public sanitary facilities. In order to set a national benchmark, Ministry of Health (MOH) in 2005 issued a decision (08/2005/QD-BYT) outlining the hygiene sanitation standard.

This National Baseline Survey on the Environmental Sanitation and Hygiene Situation in Viet Nam is the first national survey that has applied the hygienic sanitation standards as outlined in the Decision 08/2005/QD-BYT. It provides an overview of the coverage of hygienic latrines in rural households, schools and other public places. The survey presents the current situation of water usage, sanitation and hygiene practice at households, schools, and other public places in rural Viet Nam. The data collected was analyzed in various ecological regions and among different population groups.The final report was reviewed and approved by MOH’s scientific committee.

The findings from this survey will be used as a reference for further interventions, supervision, and evaluation for the National Target Programme on Rural Water Supply and Environmental Sanitation in the second phase (NTP II). The data also will be used for implementation and evaluation the cooperation programme between MOH and UNICEF in the period 2006-2010. Moreover, the results of the survey will be useful baseline to assess achievements of the countries on Viet Nam Development Goals (VDGs) and Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

The survey was conducted by MOH with the participation of Viet Nam Administration of Preventive Medicine (VAPM), and Water Supply and Sanitation Reference  Centre (WSRC) of Thai Binh Medical College, with technical as well as financial support from UNICEF.

Related info

Male Partner Involvement in Prevention for Mother-to-Child Transmission in Vietnam

Date added: 01/08/2010
Downloads: 13531
Male Partner Involvement in Prevention for Mother-to-Child Transmission in Vietnam

Challenges and Opportunities for Intervention - A report based on qualitative research conducted in Vietnam

The research team would like to thank the Reproductive Health Department at the Ministry of Health for their overall guidance and support for this study. In particular, Dr. Phuong Hoa provided leadership and oversight of the study right from its conception, and allocated precious time and energy of herself and her colleagues in the department to ensure that it was successfully completed. The authors are also grateful to Dr. Hoang Tuan of the RHD for his support and oversight of all the logistical issues, including liaising with provincial offi ces, overseeing translation, and organizing meetings.

UNICEF Vietnam provided funding for this study under the national PMTCT project supported by them. Special thanks are due to Luisa Brumana, HIV/AIDS Specialist for her intellectual guidance of this piece of work, to Mai Thu Hien, UNICEF Programme Offi cer, for oversight, support and management of the study, and to Nguyen Ngoc Trieu for administrative support.

The researchers would also like to thank the Provincial RHD in An Giang, Ho Chi Minh City and Quang Ninh for their time and support in organizing interviews and providing information. In addition, we would like to thank the many health staff who were interviewed at commune, district and provincial levels. Finally, this study owes a debt of gratitude to the all the men, women and family members who volunteered their time to respond to our questions with openness and honesty.

Lastly, all errors and omissions are solely the responsibility of the lead consultant.

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Spotlight

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Harsh punishment for child offenders doesn’t prevent further criminality

The age at which a child, can be held criminally liable is a controversial issue around the world. Within Viet Nam, this issue is currently being grappled with in the Penal Code amendments. Some argue that a "get tough on crime" approach is necessary to punish children to prevent further criminality.

However, international research shows that because of their developmental stages, labelling and treating children as criminals at an early age can have serious negative impacts on their development and successful rehabilitation.


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New Year Greetings from the United Nations Resident Coordinator a.i. in Viet Nam

 

On the occasion of New Year 2017, on behalf of the United Nations family in Viet Nam I wish to reiterate our appreciation and express our warmest wishes to our partners and friends throughout the country. We wish our partners and their families in Viet Nam peace, prosperity, good health and happiness in the coming year.

As we enter the second year of the Sustainable Development Goals era, we look forward to continuing our close cooperation for the sake of Viet Nam’s future development; one which is inclusive, equitable and sustainable, with no one left behind.

Youssouf Abdel-Jelil
United Nations Resident Coordinator a.i. in Viet Nam


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UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s message for World AIDS Day, observed on 1 December

 

Thirty-five years since the emergence of AIDS, the international community can look back with some pride.  But we must also look ahead with resolve and commitment to reach our goal of ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030.

There has been real progress in tackling the disease. More people than ever are on treatment.  Since 2010, the number of children infected through mother to child transmission has dropped by half. Fewer people die of AIDS related causes each year.  And people living with HIV are living longer lives.

The number of people with access to life-saving medicines has doubled over the past five years, now topping 18 million. With the right investments, the world can get on the fast-track to achieve our target of 30 million people on treatment by 2030.  Access to HIV medicines to prevent mother to child transmission is now available to more than 75 per cent of those in need.


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The secretary-general's message for the International Day to End Violence against Women and Girls

 

25 November 2016 - At long last, there is growing global recognition that violence against women and girls is a human rights violation, public health pandemic and serious obstacle to sustainable development.  Yet there is still much more we can and must do to turn this awareness into meaningful prevention and response.


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UNIDO Director General's Op-Ed Article to media on the occasion of UNIDO's 50th anniversary

 

Did you know that in Viet Nam, the net flow of foreign direct investment increased from USD1billion in 2003 to USD10 billion in 2008, and that by 2015 reached USD23 billion?  Or that the total value of exports rose from USD2 billion in 1990 to USD72 billion in 2010, to reach USD162 billion in 2015? These impressive figures highlight the country’s robust economic success, providing a boost to the economy and employment.

These accomplishments are largely due to the reforms undertaken by Viet Nam since Doi Moi in 1986 which liberalized the economy, attracted foreign investment, fostered exports and reduced poverty. To prepare for reform, Viet Nam received extensive technical assistance from the international community, including from the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), well before 1986 and, more precisely, since 1978.

For more than 35 years, UNIDO has been sharing international best practices to help Viet Nam develop inclusive and sustainable industry. With more than USD100 million in expenditure, UNIDO’s technical cooperation activities have been carried out across a broad range of fields, including support to the private sector and technical and industrial research organizations, facilitation of technology transfer, trade capacity-building, human resource development, environmental protection, energy efficiency, investment promotion and responsible business practices.



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