Follow us on: 


Order by : Name | Date | Hits | [ Ascendant ]

Executive Summary of the Analysis of the Situation of Children in Viet Nam 2010

Date added: 12/21/2010
Downloads: 11274
Executive Summary of the Analysis of the Situation of Children in Viet Nam 2010

Viet Nam has achieved rapid economic success and remarkable social progress in just over two decades, reaching lower middle-income status in 2009. It is a leader in the Asia-Pacific region in having achieved almost all of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) at the national level well ahead of schedule, and it is on track to achieve the others before 2015. The country was the first in Asia, and the second in the world, to ratify the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) in 1990, and it has continued to demonstrate visible and forward-looking leadership for its approximately 30 million children (around one-third of the total population). By any measure, Viet Nam has made tremendous progress for its children in a remarkably short period of time.

Yet segments of the child and adolescent population in Viet Nam continue to live in conditions of deprivation and exclusion. For example, quality health care, secondary education and clean water are not equally accessible to all children. Social exclusion is caused by several factors including economic disparities, gender inequality, and marked differences between the rural and the more affluent urban areas, as well as between geographic regions. Ethnic minorities continue to be among the poorest and have benefited least from the country’s economic growth. Poverty still causes children to drop out of school, live in the streets, or engage in high-risk behaviour such as sex work in order to survive.

Summary: National Survey on Sanitation and Hygiene in Viet Nam

Date added: 03/24/2008
Downloads: 10791
Summary: National Survey on Sanitation and Hygiene in Viet Nam

Viet Nam has made significant progress over the past decades in providing rural population with safe water supply and sanitation facilities. Nevertheless, the progress with sanitation and hygiene has been less impressive with concerns for the quality and use of household, school and public sanitary facilities. In order to set a national benchmark, Ministry of Health (MOH) in 2005 issued a decision (08/2005/QD-BYT) outlining the hygiene sanitation standard.

This National Baseline Survey on the Environmental Sanitation and Hygiene Situation in Viet Nam is the first national survey that has applied the hygienic sanitation standards as outlined in the Decision 08/2005/QD-BYT. It provides an overview of the coverage of hygienic latrines in rural households, schools and other public places. The survey presents the current situation of water usage, sanitation and hygiene practice at households, schools, and other public places in rural Viet Nam. The data collected was analyzed in various ecological regions and among different population groups.The final report was reviewed and approved by MOH’s scientific committee.

The findings from this survey will be used as a reference for further interventions, supervision, and evaluation for the National Target Programme on Rural Water Supply and Environmental Sanitation in the second phase (NTP II). The data also will be used for implementation and evaluation the cooperation programme between MOH and UNICEF in the period 2006-2010. Moreover, the results of the survey will be useful baseline to assess achievements of the countries on Viet Nam Development Goals (VDGs) and Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

The survey was conducted by MOH with the participation of Viet Nam Administration of Preventive Medicine (VAPM), and Water Supply and Sanitation Reference  Centre (WSRC) of Thai Binh Medical College, with technical as well as financial support from UNICEF.

Related info

Health equity in Viet Nam a situational analysis focused on maternal and child mortality

Date added: 03/02/2010
Downloads: 10705
Health equity in Viet Nam a situational analysis focused on maternal and child mortality

Background paper prepared for unicef consultancy on "Equity in access to quality healthcare for women and children" (april 8-10, ha long city, Viet Nam)

This situational analysis provides estimates of the degree of inequality in both maternal and child mortality and other high-level maternal and child health outcomes causally related to maternal and child mortality, including child morbidity, children's nutritional status and fertility. Estimates are also provided for several key intermediate health outcomes causally related to maternal and child mortality, including family planning, antenatal care, obstetric delivery care, immunization and curative care. Both early estimates for 1992/93 and recent estimates for 2006 of inequality are presented and compared. The main data sources used in the situational analysis include three household surveys, i.e., the 1992/93 Vietnam Living Standards Survey (VLSS), the 2006 MICS III and the 2006 Viet Nam Household Living Standards Survey (VHLSS), and provincelevel data from the MOH Health Information System (HIS) and other sources. In addition to inequality estimates, the situational analysis presents the results of regression analysis used to identify the underlying factors, such as age, sex, education, income, urbanization and ethnicity that are most closely associated with these outcomes. The observed inequalities are also decomposed in order to quantify the contributions made by the various underlying factors to the observed inequality.

The State of The World's Children 2007 Report

Date added: 09/04/2007
Downloads: 10625
The State of The World's Children 2007 Report

The State of the World's Children 2007 examines the discrimination and disempowerment women face throughout their lives - and outlines what must be done to eliminate gender discrimination and empower women and girls. It looks at the status of women today, discusses how gender equality will move all the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) forward, and shows how investment in women's rights will ultimately produce a double dividend: advancing the rights of both women and children.

For more information on the report visit:

Result of Nation-wide Survey on the Family in Viet Nam 2006 - Key Findings

Date added: 07/01/2008
Downloads: 10575
Result of Nation-wide Survey on the Family in Viet Nam 2006 - Key Findings

The results of the first-ever nationwide survey on the family in Viet Nam will be released on Thursday, June 26, at an official launch in the International Conference Centre in Ha Noi. The survey was carried out in 2006 by the Family Department of the Commission for Population, Family and Children, now moved to the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism (MOCST), in collaboration with the General Statistical Office (GSO) and the Institute for Family and Gender Studies, with support from UNICEF. The objective of the survey was to obtain information on family issues and trends in Viet Nam through interviews with adults, adolescents and elderly family members.

The solid data generated by the survey - which includes both quantitative and qualitative data disaggregated by region, ethnicity, income, age, sex, etc. – will be used by the Government and development partners to inform policy making in a wide range of areas related to the family in Viet Nam. The survey also provides timely and sound evidence for the government to formulate policies, especially related to the important recent Law on Gender Equality and Law on Prevention and Control of Domestic Violence. The data will provide a solid basis for monitoring the impact of these laws over time, as well as insight into new trends and issues affecting families in Viet Nam.

The launch will feature statements by the Ministry of Culture, Sport and Tourism, and UNICEF Viet Nam, a presentation on the main findings and recommendations from the survey, and a video depicting some of the main themes emerging from the research.

Also see


Page 2 of 12



Joint Message on the Occasion of World Teachers’ Day - Empowering Teachers, Building Sustainable Societies

Every year on World Teachers' Day, we celebrate educators and the central role they play in providing children everywhere with a quality education. Today, as the global community comes together around the new 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Goals, the role teachers play has never have been more important.

The new global education goal, SDG 4 which is at the heart of the Education 2030 Agenda, calls for "inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all". Realising this goal is critical to achieving all our global development targets – for strong societies depend on well-educated citizens and a well-trained workforce. But we can only realize this agenda if we invest in recruiting, supporting, and empowering teachers.


The Secretary-General's message on World Habitat Day


5 October 2015 - Each year on World Habitat Day, we reflect on the state of human settlements and on what we want the cities of the future to look like.

This year’s observance follows the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development – an inspiring new framework that will guide our efforts to end poverty and ensure prosperity for all on a healthy planet.  

The new Sustainable Development Goals – which include SDG-11 to “make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable” – represent a broad international consensus that recognizes sustainable urban development as a transformational approach. As part of an integrated agenda, cities and human settlements have an important role to play across the entire spectrum of the 2030 Agenda.


The Secretary-General's message on The International Day of Older Persons


1 October 2015 - On the 25th anniversary of the International Day of Older Persons, we recognize that older persons are an enormous asset to society and make a significant contribution to global development.

On September 25 at United Nations Headquarters in New York, Heads of State and governments committed themselves to building a sustainable world where no one, regardless of their age or gender, is left behind. In implementing the newly adopted 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, we must account for the demographic changes of the next 15 years. These will have a direct bearing on the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.


Remarks by the Secretary-General at summit for the adoption of the Post-2015 Development Agenda


New York, 25 September 2015

Esteemed co-Chairs of this post-2015 Summit,
Mr. President of the General Assembly,
Distinguished Heads of State and Government,
Distinguished guests,
Ladies and Gentlemen,

We have reached a defining moment in human history.

The people of the world have asked us to shine a light on a future of promise and opportunity.

Member States have responded with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

The new agenda is a promise by leaders to all people everywhere.

It is a universal, integrated and transformative vision for a better world.

It is an agenda for people, to end poverty in all its forms.

An agenda for the planet, our common home.

An agenda for shared prosperity, peace and partnership.

It conveys the urgency of climate action.

It is rooted in gender equality and respect for the rights of all.

Above all, it pledges to leave no one behind.  


The Secretary-General's message on The International Day of Peace 2015


21 September 2015 - This year's International Day of Peace comes at a time of deadly violence and destabilizing conflicts around the world. Rather than succumbing to despair, we have a collective responsibility to demand an end to the brutality and impunity that prevail.

I call on all warring parties to lay down their weapons and observe a global ceasefire. To them I say: stop the killings and the destruction, and create space for lasting peace.

Although it may seem hopelessly distant, the dream of peace pulses in the lives of people everywhere.

RSS Email Subscription

Enter your email address: