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Executive Summary of the Analysis of the Situation of Children in Viet Nam 2010

Date added: 12/21/2010
Downloads: 12001
Executive Summary of the Analysis of the Situation of Children in Viet Nam 2010

Viet Nam has achieved rapid economic success and remarkable social progress in just over two decades, reaching lower middle-income status in 2009. It is a leader in the Asia-Pacific region in having achieved almost all of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) at the national level well ahead of schedule, and it is on track to achieve the others before 2015. The country was the first in Asia, and the second in the world, to ratify the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) in 1990, and it has continued to demonstrate visible and forward-looking leadership for its approximately 30 million children (around one-third of the total population). By any measure, Viet Nam has made tremendous progress for its children in a remarkably short period of time.

Yet segments of the child and adolescent population in Viet Nam continue to live in conditions of deprivation and exclusion. For example, quality health care, secondary education and clean water are not equally accessible to all children. Social exclusion is caused by several factors including economic disparities, gender inequality, and marked differences between the rural and the more affluent urban areas, as well as between geographic regions. Ethnic minorities continue to be among the poorest and have benefited least from the country’s economic growth. Poverty still causes children to drop out of school, live in the streets, or engage in high-risk behaviour such as sex work in order to survive.

Summary: National Survey on Sanitation and Hygiene in Viet Nam

Date added: 03/24/2008
Downloads: 11556
Summary: National Survey on Sanitation and Hygiene in Viet Nam

Viet Nam has made significant progress over the past decades in providing rural population with safe water supply and sanitation facilities. Nevertheless, the progress with sanitation and hygiene has been less impressive with concerns for the quality and use of household, school and public sanitary facilities. In order to set a national benchmark, Ministry of Health (MOH) in 2005 issued a decision (08/2005/QD-BYT) outlining the hygiene sanitation standard.

This National Baseline Survey on the Environmental Sanitation and Hygiene Situation in Viet Nam is the first national survey that has applied the hygienic sanitation standards as outlined in the Decision 08/2005/QD-BYT. It provides an overview of the coverage of hygienic latrines in rural households, schools and other public places. The survey presents the current situation of water usage, sanitation and hygiene practice at households, schools, and other public places in rural Viet Nam. The data collected was analyzed in various ecological regions and among different population groups.The final report was reviewed and approved by MOH’s scientific committee.

The findings from this survey will be used as a reference for further interventions, supervision, and evaluation for the National Target Programme on Rural Water Supply and Environmental Sanitation in the second phase (NTP II). The data also will be used for implementation and evaluation the cooperation programme between MOH and UNICEF in the period 2006-2010. Moreover, the results of the survey will be useful baseline to assess achievements of the countries on Viet Nam Development Goals (VDGs) and Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

The survey was conducted by MOH with the participation of Viet Nam Administration of Preventive Medicine (VAPM), and Water Supply and Sanitation Reference  Centre (WSRC) of Thai Binh Medical College, with technical as well as financial support from UNICEF.

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Health equity in Viet Nam a situational analysis focused on maternal and child mortality

Date added: 03/02/2010
Downloads: 11481
Health equity in Viet Nam a situational analysis focused on maternal and child mortality

Background paper prepared for unicef consultancy on "Equity in access to quality healthcare for women and children" (april 8-10, ha long city, Viet Nam)

This situational analysis provides estimates of the degree of inequality in both maternal and child mortality and other high-level maternal and child health outcomes causally related to maternal and child mortality, including child morbidity, children's nutritional status and fertility. Estimates are also provided for several key intermediate health outcomes causally related to maternal and child mortality, including family planning, antenatal care, obstetric delivery care, immunization and curative care. Both early estimates for 1992/93 and recent estimates for 2006 of inequality are presented and compared. The main data sources used in the situational analysis include three household surveys, i.e., the 1992/93 Vietnam Living Standards Survey (VLSS), the 2006 MICS III and the 2006 Viet Nam Household Living Standards Survey (VHLSS), and provincelevel data from the MOH Health Information System (HIS) and other sources. In addition to inequality estimates, the situational analysis presents the results of regression analysis used to identify the underlying factors, such as age, sex, education, income, urbanization and ethnicity that are most closely associated with these outcomes. The observed inequalities are also decomposed in order to quantify the contributions made by the various underlying factors to the observed inequality.

The State of The World's Children 2007 Report

Date added: 09/04/2007
Downloads: 11460
The State of The World's Children 2007 Report

The State of the World's Children 2007 examines the discrimination and disempowerment women face throughout their lives - and outlines what must be done to eliminate gender discrimination and empower women and girls. It looks at the status of women today, discusses how gender equality will move all the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) forward, and shows how investment in women's rights will ultimately produce a double dividend: advancing the rights of both women and children.

For more information on the report visit: http://www.unicef.org/publications/index_36587.html

Result of Nation-wide Survey on the Family in Viet Nam 2006 - Key Findings

Date added: 07/01/2008
Downloads: 11377
Result of Nation-wide Survey on the Family in Viet Nam 2006 - Key Findings

The results of the first-ever nationwide survey on the family in Viet Nam will be released on Thursday, June 26, at an official launch in the International Conference Centre in Ha Noi. The survey was carried out in 2006 by the Family Department of the Commission for Population, Family and Children, now moved to the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism (MOCST), in collaboration with the General Statistical Office (GSO) and the Institute for Family and Gender Studies, with support from UNICEF. The objective of the survey was to obtain information on family issues and trends in Viet Nam through interviews with adults, adolescents and elderly family members.

The solid data generated by the survey - which includes both quantitative and qualitative data disaggregated by region, ethnicity, income, age, sex, etc. – will be used by the Government and development partners to inform policy making in a wide range of areas related to the family in Viet Nam. The survey also provides timely and sound evidence for the government to formulate policies, especially related to the important recent Law on Gender Equality and Law on Prevention and Control of Domestic Violence. The data will provide a solid basis for monitoring the impact of these laws over time, as well as insight into new trends and issues affecting families in Viet Nam.

The launch will feature statements by the Ministry of Culture, Sport and Tourism, and UNICEF Viet Nam, a presentation on the main findings and recommendations from the survey, and a video depicting some of the main themes emerging from the research.

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Spotlight

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72 hours to make the world better for children with disabilities

TOM (Tikkun Olam Makers) is an international non-profit organization using design and technology to address neglected problems. The TOM event is an intersection between challenges and technical solutions. Participants with different backgrounds and expertise gather together for a 72-hour “makeathon” and build a product to help someone in need. TOM focuses on inclusive designs with a reasonable price for people with disabilities. In Hebrew, Tikkun Olam means changing the world; and this is TOM’s mission. (See more information about TOM at www.tomglobal.org) Dead

In 2016, the United States Consulate General in Ho Chi Minh City, the Embassy of the State of Israel, UNICEF, Disability Research and Capacity Development (DRD), FABLAB Saigon, and other partners from academia and the private sector will co-organize the TOM event in Ho Chi Minh City. This is a unique opportunity for children with disabilities and families to present their challenges, as well as share ideas of products that would help to reduce their challenges. Based on these ideas, technical teams will develop innovative solutions during a 72-hour “makeathon” to help children have a better life.


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The Secretary-General’s message on Human Rights Day

 

10 December 2015 - Amid large-scale atrocities and widespread abuses across the world, Human Rights Day should rally more concerted global action to promote the timeless principles that we have collectively pledged to uphold.

In a year that marks the 70th anniversary of the United Nations, we can draw inspiration from the history of the modern human rights movement, which emerged from the Second World War.

At that time, President Franklin D. Roosevelt of the United States identified four basic freedoms as the birthright of all people: freedom of expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want and freedom from fear.  His wife, Eleanor Roosevelt, joined forces at the United Nations with human rights champions from around the world to enshrine these freedoms in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.


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The Secretary-General’s message on International Anti-corruption Day

 

9 December 2015 - Global attitudes towards corruption have changed dramatically.  Where once bribery, corruption and illicit financial flows were often considered part of the cost of doing business, today corruption is widely -- and rightly -- understood as criminal and corrosive. The new 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, our plan to end poverty and ensure lives of dignity for all, recognizes the need to fight corruption in all its aspects and calls for significant reductions in illicit financial flows as well as for the recovery of stolen assets.

Corruption has disastrous impacts on development when funds that should be devoted to schools, health clinics and other vital public services are instead diverted into the hands of criminals or dishonest officials.


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The Secretary-General’s message on World AIDS Day

 

1 December 2015 - This year, we mark World AIDS Day with new hope. I applaud the staunch advocacy of activists. I commend the persistent efforts of health workers. And I pay tribute to the principled stance of human rights defenders and the courage of all those who have joined forces to fight for global progress against the disease.

World leaders have unanimously committed to ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030 as part of the Sustainable Development Goals adopted in September. This commitment reflects the power of solidarity to forge, from a destructive disease, one of the most inclusive movements in modern history.


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The Secretary-General’s message on the International Day For The Elimination of Violence Against Women

 

25 November 2015 - The atrocity crimes being committed against women and girls in conflict zones, along with the domestic abuse found in all countries, are grave threats to progress.

I am deeply concerned about the plight of women and girls living in conditions of armed conflict, who suffer various forms of violence, sexual assault, sexual slavery and trafficking. Violent extremists are perverting religious teachings to justify the mass subjugation and abuse of women. These are not random acts of violence, or the incidental fallout of war, but rather systematic efforts to deny women's freedoms and control their bodies. As the world strives to counter and prevent violence extremism, the protection and empowerment of women and girls must be a key consideration.



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