Follow us on: 


Order by : Name | Date | Hits | [ Descendent ]

National Nutrition Strategy for 2011-2012, with a vision toward 2030

Date added: 04/04/2012
Downloads: 7714
National Nutrition Strategy for 2011-2012, with a vision toward 2030

In the last decade, socio-economic development combined with the attention, guidance, and investment from the Party and the Government, the efforts of health sector, and the active involvement of other sectors and the society, have contributed to improvement in household food security. Vietnam has shown remarkable achievement in improving health and nutritional status of the population. The majority of the objectives from the National Nutrition Strategy during the period of 2001 - 2010 have been met or exceeded. Nutrition knowledge and practices in the population have been remarkably improved. The prevalence of undernutrition in children under 5 has continuously and rapidly decreased. During the 35th session of the Standing Committee in Nutrition of the United Nations held in Hanoi in March 2008, UNICEF recognised Vietnam as one of the few countries with reduction of child malnutrition close to the Millenium Development Goals (MDG).

Related information

Review of the implementation of the national policy on prevention of injury 2006 - 2009

Date added: 04/01/2010
Downloads: 7808
Review of the implementation of the national policy on prevention of injury 2006 - 2009

The purpose is to review progress on the implementation of the National Injury Prevention Policy and to make recommendations for future directions. Specific aims and objectives of the review were to: (i) Examine the conformity of national policy with international standards; (ii) Assess key achievements and constraints encountered by implementing agencies in the implementation of the National Policy; (iii) Identify lessons learned; and (iv) Provide specific recommendations based on the review for necessary adjustments and/or further development of the National Policy.

Key findings and conclusions

  • Since the National Policy was decreed in 2002, substantial progress on injury prevention has been made in many areas and against each of the general objectives. While a great deal has been done in terms of governance,  regulation and program development, this has not yet translated into substantial injury and death reductions, with the possible exception of road traffic injury, which may have commenced a downward trend, though it is too early to make this judgement.
  • The lack of adequate data systems to describe the injury problem, to identify specific injury mechanisms and settings to target for intervention, and to monitor progress is a substantial barrier to achieving the full potential of the National Policy.
  • Other areas where achievements are lacking are also identified in detail and multiple recommendations have been made for improvements and for some new directions.
  • A future high level National Action Plan is needed urgently to provide co-ordination, leadership and central funding.

Child Poverty in East Asia and the Pacific: Deprivations and Disparities - A Study of Seven Countrie

Date added: 11/30/2011
Downloads: 7826
Child Poverty in East Asia and the Pacific: Deprivations and Disparities - A Study of Seven Countrie

Poverty reduction begins with children. A child’s experience of poverty is very different from that of an adult. Income is but one dimension among many that should be assessed when analyzing child poverty and disparity. Non-monetary deprivation in dimensions such as shelter, food, water, sanitation, education, health, and information is equally, if not more, revealing. Since deprivation along these dimensions can have significant negative consequences on a child’s development and future, an examination of multidimensional child poverty and associated disparities is clearly warranted.

As part of UNICEF’s Global Study on Child Poverty and Disparities, several countries in East Asia and the Pacific have undertaken national child poverty and disparity studies. In this paper, results from seven of those countries, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Mongolia, the Philippines, Thailand, Vanuatu and Viet Nam, are reviewed. The objective is to identify trends and lessons, generate strategies for UNICEF EAPRO, and to contribute toward a richer conceptualization of the situation of children in the region.

Related Links:


Childhood Injury Prevention: The story of UNICEF's interventions in Viet Nam

Date added: 12/01/2008
Downloads: 7908
Childhood Injury Prevention: The story of UNICEF's interventions in Viet Nam

On a typical day in Viet Nam almost twenty children die from injuries. Over half of them drown and many more are killed or severely wounded as a result of road traffic accidents, poisoning, falls, burns, animal bites and cuts from sharp objects. Although these injuries are easily preventable, they continue to harm Viet Nam’s children and to cause untold suffering for families and communities.

UNICEF has been working in partnership with the government of Viet Nam to combat this crisis since 2001. As one of the first childhood injury prevention (CIP) programmes of its kind in the developing world, UNICEF has helped to provide a comprehensive, cross-sectoral response to addressing childhood injury and has made significant progress at both national and local levels. Today, childhood injury is no longer an invisible issue in Viet Nam. Community members have become increasingly aware of the injury risks children face and have begun to change their behaviours to prevent unnecessary harm and deaths. Work in this area however is just getting started.  Childhood injury prevention remains a huge challenge in Viet Nam that will require the continued commitment of a wide range of partners, sectors and communities in order to save and improve the lives of children. This report formally documents the experiences and lessons learnt from UNICEF’s childhood injury prevention interventions in Viet Nam over the past seven years.

Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011

Date added: 07/05/2012
Downloads: 8154
Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011

The Viet Nam Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) was carried out in 2010-2011 by the General Statistics Office of Viet Nam. Financial and technical support was provided by the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and financial support was provided by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA).

MICS is an international household survey programme developed by UNICEF. The Viet Nam MICS was conducted as part of the fourth global round of MICS surveys (MICS 4). MICS provides up-to-date information on the situation of children and women and measures key indicators that allow countries to monitor progress towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and other internationally agreed upon commitments. Additional information on the global MICS project may be obtained from

pdfClick here to download the sumary report

Page 7 of 12



Joint Message on the Occasion of World Teachers’ Day - Empowering Teachers, Building Sustainable Societies

Every year on World Teachers' Day, we celebrate educators and the central role they play in providing children everywhere with a quality education. Today, as the global community comes together around the new 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Goals, the role teachers play has never have been more important.

The new global education goal, SDG 4 which is at the heart of the Education 2030 Agenda, calls for "inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all". Realising this goal is critical to achieving all our global development targets – for strong societies depend on well-educated citizens and a well-trained workforce. But we can only realize this agenda if we invest in recruiting, supporting, and empowering teachers.


The Secretary-General's message on World Habitat Day


5 October 2015 - Each year on World Habitat Day, we reflect on the state of human settlements and on what we want the cities of the future to look like.

This year’s observance follows the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development – an inspiring new framework that will guide our efforts to end poverty and ensure prosperity for all on a healthy planet.  

The new Sustainable Development Goals – which include SDG-11 to “make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable” – represent a broad international consensus that recognizes sustainable urban development as a transformational approach. As part of an integrated agenda, cities and human settlements have an important role to play across the entire spectrum of the 2030 Agenda.


The Secretary-General's message on The International Day of Older Persons


1 October 2015 - On the 25th anniversary of the International Day of Older Persons, we recognize that older persons are an enormous asset to society and make a significant contribution to global development.

On September 25 at United Nations Headquarters in New York, Heads of State and governments committed themselves to building a sustainable world where no one, regardless of their age or gender, is left behind. In implementing the newly adopted 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, we must account for the demographic changes of the next 15 years. These will have a direct bearing on the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.


Remarks by the Secretary-General at summit for the adoption of the Post-2015 Development Agenda


New York, 25 September 2015

Esteemed co-Chairs of this post-2015 Summit,
Mr. President of the General Assembly,
Distinguished Heads of State and Government,
Distinguished guests,
Ladies and Gentlemen,

We have reached a defining moment in human history.

The people of the world have asked us to shine a light on a future of promise and opportunity.

Member States have responded with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

The new agenda is a promise by leaders to all people everywhere.

It is a universal, integrated and transformative vision for a better world.

It is an agenda for people, to end poverty in all its forms.

An agenda for the planet, our common home.

An agenda for shared prosperity, peace and partnership.

It conveys the urgency of climate action.

It is rooted in gender equality and respect for the rights of all.

Above all, it pledges to leave no one behind.  


The Secretary-General's message on The International Day of Peace 2015


21 September 2015 - This year's International Day of Peace comes at a time of deadly violence and destabilizing conflicts around the world. Rather than succumbing to despair, we have a collective responsibility to demand an end to the brutality and impunity that prevail.

I call on all warring parties to lay down their weapons and observe a global ceasefire. To them I say: stop the killings and the destruction, and create space for lasting peace.

Although it may seem hopelessly distant, the dream of peace pulses in the lives of people everywhere.

RSS Email Subscription

Enter your email address: