Follow us on: 
facebook
youtube
flick
 

Documents

Order by : Name | Date | Hits | [ Descendent ]

Review of the implementation of the national policy on prevention of injury 2006 - 2009

Date added: 04/01/2010
Downloads: 7345
Review of the implementation of the national policy on prevention of injury 2006 - 2009

The purpose is to review progress on the implementation of the National Injury Prevention Policy and to make recommendations for future directions. Specific aims and objectives of the review were to: (i) Examine the conformity of national policy with international standards; (ii) Assess key achievements and constraints encountered by implementing agencies in the implementation of the National Policy; (iii) Identify lessons learned; and (iv) Provide specific recommendations based on the review for necessary adjustments and/or further development of the National Policy.

Key findings and conclusions

  • Since the National Policy was decreed in 2002, substantial progress on injury prevention has been made in many areas and against each of the general objectives. While a great deal has been done in terms of governance,  regulation and program development, this has not yet translated into substantial injury and death reductions, with the possible exception of road traffic injury, which may have commenced a downward trend, though it is too early to make this judgement.
  • The lack of adequate data systems to describe the injury problem, to identify specific injury mechanisms and settings to target for intervention, and to monitor progress is a substantial barrier to achieving the full potential of the National Policy.
  • Other areas where achievements are lacking are also identified in detail and multiple recommendations have been made for improvements and for some new directions.
  • A future high level National Action Plan is needed urgently to provide co-ordination, leadership and central funding.

Child Poverty in East Asia and the Pacific: Deprivations and Disparities - A Study of Seven Countrie

Date added: 11/30/2011
Downloads: 7412
Child Poverty in East Asia and the Pacific: Deprivations and Disparities - A Study of Seven Countrie

Poverty reduction begins with children. A child’s experience of poverty is very different from that of an adult. Income is but one dimension among many that should be assessed when analyzing child poverty and disparity. Non-monetary deprivation in dimensions such as shelter, food, water, sanitation, education, health, and information is equally, if not more, revealing. Since deprivation along these dimensions can have significant negative consequences on a child’s development and future, an examination of multidimensional child poverty and associated disparities is clearly warranted.

As part of UNICEF’s Global Study on Child Poverty and Disparities, several countries in East Asia and the Pacific have undertaken national child poverty and disparity studies. In this paper, results from seven of those countries, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Mongolia, the Philippines, Thailand, Vanuatu and Viet Nam, are reviewed. The objective is to identify trends and lessons, generate strategies for UNICEF EAPRO, and to contribute toward a richer conceptualization of the situation of children in the region.

Related Links:

Downloads:

Childhood Injury Prevention: The story of UNICEF's interventions in Viet Nam

Date added: 12/01/2008
Downloads: 7479
Childhood Injury Prevention: The story of UNICEF's interventions in Viet Nam

On a typical day in Viet Nam almost twenty children die from injuries. Over half of them drown and many more are killed or severely wounded as a result of road traffic accidents, poisoning, falls, burns, animal bites and cuts from sharp objects. Although these injuries are easily preventable, they continue to harm Viet Nam’s children and to cause untold suffering for families and communities.

UNICEF has been working in partnership with the government of Viet Nam to combat this crisis since 2001. As one of the first childhood injury prevention (CIP) programmes of its kind in the developing world, UNICEF has helped to provide a comprehensive, cross-sectoral response to addressing childhood injury and has made significant progress at both national and local levels. Today, childhood injury is no longer an invisible issue in Viet Nam. Community members have become increasingly aware of the injury risks children face and have begun to change their behaviours to prevent unnecessary harm and deaths. Work in this area however is just getting started.  Childhood injury prevention remains a huge challenge in Viet Nam that will require the continued commitment of a wide range of partners, sectors and communities in order to save and improve the lives of children. This report formally documents the experiences and lessons learnt from UNICEF’s childhood injury prevention interventions in Viet Nam over the past seven years.

Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011

Date added: 07/05/2012
Downloads: 7685
Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011

The Viet Nam Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) was carried out in 2010-2011 by the General Statistics Office of Viet Nam. Financial and technical support was provided by the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and financial support was provided by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA).

MICS is an international household survey programme developed by UNICEF. The Viet Nam MICS was conducted as part of the fourth global round of MICS surveys (MICS 4). MICS provides up-to-date information on the situation of children and women and measures key indicators that allow countries to monitor progress towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and other internationally agreed upon commitments. Additional information on the global MICS project may be obtained from www.childinfo.org.

pdfClick here to download the sumary report

Fact Sheet on Clean Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) in Viet Nam

Date added: 10/15/2010
Downloads: 8053
Fact Sheet on Clean Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) in Viet Nam

Background on Global Handwashing Day

The practice of hand-washing with soap tops the international hygiene agenda on October 15, with the celebration of Global Hand-washing Day (GHWD). Since its inception in 2008 – which was designated as the International Year of Sanitation by the UN General Assembly – Global Hand-washing Day has been echoing and reinforcing the call for improved hygiene practices worldwide.

Page 7 of 12

Spotlight

ban-ki-moon.jpg

The Secretary-General's Message on World Day Against Trafficking In Persons

 

30 July 2015 - Around the world, criminals are selling people for profit.  Vulnerable women and girls form the majority of human trafficking victims, including those driven into degrading sexual exploitation.

Trafficked persons are often tricked into servitude with the false promise of a well-paid job. Migrants crossing deadly seas and burning deserts to escape conflict, poverty and persecution are also at risk of being trafficked.  Individuals can find themselves alone in a foreign land where they have been stripped of their passports, forced into debt and exploited for labour.  Children and young people can find their lives stolen, their education blocked and their dreams dashed. It is an assault on their most basic human rights and fundamental freedoms.


ban-ki-moon.jpg

The Secretary-General's Message on World Youth Skills Day

 

15 July 2015 - I welcome this first-ever commemoration of World Youth Skills Day.  On July 15th each year, the international community will underscore the value of helping young people to upgrade their own abilities to contribute to our common future.

While overall more young people have greater educational opportunities than in the past, there are still some 75 million adolescents who are out of school, denied the quality education they deserve and unable to acquire the skills they need.

We may see an understandably frustrated youth population – but that picture is incomplete.  With the right skills, these young people are exactly the force we need to drive progress across the global agenda and build more inclusive and vibrant societies.


ban-ki-moon.jpg

The Secretary-General's Message on World Population Day


11 July 2015
- Not since the end of the Second World War have so many people been forced from their homes across the planet. With nearly 60 million individuals having fled conflict or disaster, women and adolescent girls are particularly vulnerable.  Violent extremists and armed groups are committing terrible abuses that result in trauma, unintended pregnancy and infection with HIV and other diseases.  Shame and accountability rest squarely on the shoulders of the perpetrators who wage cowardly battles across the bodies of innocents.


ban-ki-moon.jpg

The Secretary-General’s Message on the International Day against Drug Abuse and Illegal Trafficking

 

26 June 2015 - In September, leaders from around the world will meet at the United Nations to adopt an ambitious new sustainable development agenda to eradicate extreme poverty and provide a life of dignity for all.  This ambition, while achievable, must address various obstacles, including the deadly harm to communities and individuals caused by drug trafficking and drug abuse.

Our shared response to this challenge is founded on the international drug control conventions.  In full compliance with human rights standards and norms, the United Nations advocates a careful re-balancing of the international policy on controlled drugs.  We must consider alternatives to criminalization and incarceration of people who use drugs and focus criminal justice efforts on those involved in supply.  We should increase the focus on public health, prevention, treatment and care, as well as on economic, social and cultural strategies.  


ban-ki-moon.jpg

The Secretary-General’s Message on the International Day of Yoga

 

21 June 2015 - During a visit to India this year, I had the opportunity to practice yoga with one of my senior advisors.  Although he happened to be a son of the country, I might equally have done the same with many other colleagues from different parts of the world.  Yoga is an ancient discipline from a traditional setting that has grown in popularity to be enjoyed by practitioners in every region.  By proclaiming 21 June as the International Day of Yoga, the General Assembly has recognized the holistic benefits of this timeless practice and its inherent compatibility with the principles and values of the United Nations.

Yoga offers a simple, accessible and inclusive means to promote physical and spiritual health and well-being.  It promotes respect for one’s fellow human beings and for the planet we share.  And yoga does not discriminate; to varying degrees, all people can practice, regardless of their relative strength, age or ability.



RSS Email Subscription

Enter your email address: