Follow us on: 


Order by : Name | Date | Hits | [ Descendent ]

National Nutrition Strategy for 2011-2012, with a vision toward 2030

Date added: 04/04/2012
Downloads: 8045
National Nutrition Strategy for 2011-2012, with a vision toward 2030

In the last decade, socio-economic development combined with the attention, guidance, and investment from the Party and the Government, the efforts of health sector, and the active involvement of other sectors and the society, have contributed to improvement in household food security. Vietnam has shown remarkable achievement in improving health and nutritional status of the population. The majority of the objectives from the National Nutrition Strategy during the period of 2001 - 2010 have been met or exceeded. Nutrition knowledge and practices in the population have been remarkably improved. The prevalence of undernutrition in children under 5 has continuously and rapidly decreased. During the 35th session of the Standing Committee in Nutrition of the United Nations held in Hanoi in March 2008, UNICEF recognised Vietnam as one of the few countries with reduction of child malnutrition close to the Millenium Development Goals (MDG).

Related information

An analysis of the situation of children in An Giang province

Date added: 06/16/2012
Downloads: 8118
An analysis of the situation of children in An Giang province

This Situation Analysis was undertaken in 2010 and 2011 under the Provincial Child Friendly Programme within the framework of the Country Programme of Cooperation between the Government of Viet Nam and UNICEF in the period 2006-2011. This publication exemplifi es the strong partnership between An Giang Province and UNICEF Viet Nam.

The research was completed by a research team consisting of Edwin Shanks, Nguyen Tam Giang and Duong Quoc Hung. Findings of the research were arrived at following intensive consultations with local stakeholders, during fi eldwork in late 2010 and through a consultation workshop in An Giang in April 2011. Inputs were received from experts from relevant provincial line departments, agencies and other organisations, including the Department of Planning and Investment, the Department of Labour, Invalids and Social Affairs, the Department of Education, the Department of Health, the Provincial Statistics Offi ce, the Department of Finance, the Social Protection Centre, the Women's Union, the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, the Provincial Centre for Rural Water Supply and Sanitation, the Committee for Ethnic Minorities, representatives from the districts of Tinh Bien and Tan Chau and Long Xuyen City and representatives from the communes of Vinh Trung and Chau Phong and My Binh ward.

Finalisation and editing of the report was conducted by the UNICEF Viet Nam Country Office.

An Giang Province and UNICEF Viet Nam would like to sincerely thank all those who contributed to this publication.

Review of the implementation of the national policy on prevention of injury 2006 - 2009

Date added: 04/01/2010
Downloads: 8175
Review of the implementation of the national policy on prevention of injury 2006 - 2009

The purpose is to review progress on the implementation of the National Injury Prevention Policy and to make recommendations for future directions. Specific aims and objectives of the review were to: (i) Examine the conformity of national policy with international standards; (ii) Assess key achievements and constraints encountered by implementing agencies in the implementation of the National Policy; (iii) Identify lessons learned; and (iv) Provide specific recommendations based on the review for necessary adjustments and/or further development of the National Policy.

Key findings and conclusions

  • Since the National Policy was decreed in 2002, substantial progress on injury prevention has been made in many areas and against each of the general objectives. While a great deal has been done in terms of governance,  regulation and program development, this has not yet translated into substantial injury and death reductions, with the possible exception of road traffic injury, which may have commenced a downward trend, though it is too early to make this judgement.
  • The lack of adequate data systems to describe the injury problem, to identify specific injury mechanisms and settings to target for intervention, and to monitor progress is a substantial barrier to achieving the full potential of the National Policy.
  • Other areas where achievements are lacking are also identified in detail and multiple recommendations have been made for improvements and for some new directions.
  • A future high level National Action Plan is needed urgently to provide co-ordination, leadership and central funding.

Child Poverty in East Asia and the Pacific: Deprivations and Disparities - A Study of Seven Countrie

Date added: 11/30/2011
Downloads: 8183
Child Poverty in East Asia and the Pacific: Deprivations and Disparities - A Study of Seven Countrie

Poverty reduction begins with children. A child’s experience of poverty is very different from that of an adult. Income is but one dimension among many that should be assessed when analyzing child poverty and disparity. Non-monetary deprivation in dimensions such as shelter, food, water, sanitation, education, health, and information is equally, if not more, revealing. Since deprivation along these dimensions can have significant negative consequences on a child’s development and future, an examination of multidimensional child poverty and associated disparities is clearly warranted.

As part of UNICEF’s Global Study on Child Poverty and Disparities, several countries in East Asia and the Pacific have undertaken national child poverty and disparity studies. In this paper, results from seven of those countries, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Mongolia, the Philippines, Thailand, Vanuatu and Viet Nam, are reviewed. The objective is to identify trends and lessons, generate strategies for UNICEF EAPRO, and to contribute toward a richer conceptualization of the situation of children in the region.

Related Links:


Childhood Injury Prevention: The story of UNICEF's interventions in Viet Nam

Date added: 12/01/2008
Downloads: 8251
Childhood Injury Prevention: The story of UNICEF's interventions in Viet Nam

On a typical day in Viet Nam almost twenty children die from injuries. Over half of them drown and many more are killed or severely wounded as a result of road traffic accidents, poisoning, falls, burns, animal bites and cuts from sharp objects. Although these injuries are easily preventable, they continue to harm Viet Nam’s children and to cause untold suffering for families and communities.

UNICEF has been working in partnership with the government of Viet Nam to combat this crisis since 2001. As one of the first childhood injury prevention (CIP) programmes of its kind in the developing world, UNICEF has helped to provide a comprehensive, cross-sectoral response to addressing childhood injury and has made significant progress at both national and local levels. Today, childhood injury is no longer an invisible issue in Viet Nam. Community members have become increasingly aware of the injury risks children face and have begun to change their behaviours to prevent unnecessary harm and deaths. Work in this area however is just getting started.  Childhood injury prevention remains a huge challenge in Viet Nam that will require the continued commitment of a wide range of partners, sectors and communities in order to save and improve the lives of children. This report formally documents the experiences and lessons learnt from UNICEF’s childhood injury prevention interventions in Viet Nam over the past seven years.

Page 7 of 12



The Secretary-General’s message on the International Day For The Elimination of Violence Against Women


25 November 2015 - The atrocity crimes being committed against women and girls in conflict zones, along with the domestic abuse found in all countries, are grave threats to progress.

I am deeply concerned about the plight of women and girls living in conditions of armed conflict, who suffer various forms of violence, sexual assault, sexual slavery and trafficking. Violent extremists are perverting religious teachings to justify the mass subjugation and abuse of women. These are not random acts of violence, or the incidental fallout of war, but rather systematic efforts to deny women's freedoms and control their bodies. As the world strives to counter and prevent violence extremism, the protection and empowerment of women and girls must be a key consideration.


The Secretary-General's message on World Diabetes Day 2015


14 November 2015 - Close to 350 million people in the world have diabetes, and the prevalence is rising rapidly, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. There is much all of us can do to minimize our risk of getting the disease and, even if we do get it, to live long and healthy lives with it.

People who have diabetes lose their ability to properly regulate their blood sugar. Out-of-control blood sugar can lead to nerve damage, heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney failure and lower-limb amputation.


The Secretary-General’s message on World Food Day 2015

16 October 2015 - This year's observance of World Food Day follows the landmark adoption by world leaders of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including a set of 17 goals to guide our work towards a future of dignity and prosperity for all on a healthy planet.

How we choose to grow, process, distribute and consume the food we eat has a profound effect on people, planet, prosperity and peace. Delivering on the promise of the 2030 Agenda will not be possible without rapid progress towards ending hunger and undernutrition. In the same way, delivering on the commitment to end hunger forever, for all people, will not be possible without major gains across the new Agenda.


The Secretary-General’s message for The International Day For Disaster Reduction

13 October 2015 - This year's observance of the International Day for Disaster Reduction is dedicated to the power of traditional, indigenous and local knowledge.

In March 2015 in Sendai, Japan, I met with the President of Vanuatu,

His Excellency Baldwin Lonsdale, at the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction. On that very day, his island nation was devastated by Cyclone Pam, one of the strongest storms ever to strike the Pacific.

The force of the storm led to expectations that there would be great loss of life. Thankfully, this was not the case. One reason was that cyclone shelters built in the traditional style from local materials, saved many lives.


The Secretary-General's message on the International Day of the girl child


New York, 11 October 2015 - The newly adopted Sustainable Development Goals rightly include key targets for gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls. They offer an opportunity for a global commitment to breaking intergenerational transmission of poverty, violence, exclusion and discrimination – and realizing our vision of a life of dignity for all.

Our task now is to get to work on meeting the SDG targets and making good on our promises to give girls all the opportunities they deserve as they mature to adulthood by 2030. That means enabling them to avoid child marriage and unwanted pregnancy, protect against HIV transmission, stay safe from female genital mutilation, and acquire the education and skills they need to realize their potential. It also requires ensuring their sexual health and reproductive rights. Girls everywhere should be able to lead lives free from fear and violence. If we achieve this progress for girls, we will see advances across society.

RSS Email Subscription

Enter your email address: