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2013 World Drug Report points to alarming rise in new psychoactive substances

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unodc report Ha Noi, 26 June 2013 –  The UN in Viet Nam presented the key findings of the World Drug Report today in the specific context of South East Asian Region and Viet Nam. According to UNODC Viet Nam, while some new psychoactive substances are found in pills sold as ‘ecstasy’, amphetamine-type stimulant (ATS) has since 2010 continued to be the second most widely used drug in the country. ATS use is most prevalent among young drug users living in large cities, border areas and industrial zones. However, the use of ATS and other illicit drugs continues to rise in rural areas.

“We recognize the increasing number of drug seizures and cross-border trafficking operations in Viet Nam as well as the danger of increasing abuse of ATS and new psychoactive substances among the Vietnamese youth,” said the UN Resident Coordinator in Viet Nam Pratibha Mehta. “We need to help young people become more aware of the harmful consequences of these substances.”

The World Drug Report is launched today in Vienna by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) at a special high-level event of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND). The special high-level event marks the first step on the road to the 2014 high-level review by the Commission on Narcotic Drugs of the Political Declaration and Plan of Action which will be followed, in 2016, by the UN General Assembly Special Session on the issue.

UNODC Executive Director, Yury Fedotov, said “We have agreed on a path for our ongoing discussion. I hope it will lead to an affirmation of the importance of the international drug control conventions, as well as an acknowledgement that the conventions are humane, human-rights centred and flexible. There must also be a firm  emphasis on health and we must support and promote alternative sustainable livelihoods. It is also essential that we recognize the important role played by criminal justice systems in countering the world drug problem and the need for enhanced work against precursor chemicals.”

More information:

Read the press release, the Viet Nam Drug Control Brief, the Viet Nam Fact Sheet or the World Drug Report 2013 Highlights.





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