Follow us on: 
facebook
youtube
flick
 

Road Safety and Tobacco Programmes in Viet Nam Visited by Michael Bloomberg

Print Email

M bloomberg reutersNew York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg (C) helps a pupil put on a helmet during an event to give children motorcycle helmets at a school in Hanoi March 23, 2012. Bloomberg arrived in Vietnam on Friday to visit programmes supported by his charitable foundation Bloomberg Philanthropies, including tobacco and road safety issues, according to a press release. REUTERS/Kham

Credit: Reuters

Ha Noi, 23 March 2012Mr Michael R. Bloomberg, philanthropist and Mayor of New York City arrived in Viet Nam today, and is visiting programmes supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies’.

Through the World Health Organization (WHO) and associated partners, Bloomberg Philanthropies’ have been instrumental in supporting programmes on two major public health issues, tobacco and road safety, which combined, claim an estimated 55,000 lives in Viet Nam every year (40,000 for tobacco and a further 15,000 from road trauma).

Bloomberg Philanthropies’ support to road safety in Viet Nam is part of a broader project to facilitate national governments’ uptake of road safety action in 10 low and middle-income countries.  – known as the Road Safety in Ten Countries (RS10) project. These countries collectively represent approximately 50% of the 1.2 million deaths that occur on the world’s roads each year, costing countries between 1% and 3% of their gross national product. Launched in 2010, this project is aligned with the goals of the United Nations Decade of Action on Road Safety (2011–2020), which aims to stem the expected increase in road traffic deaths over the coming decade. Bloomberg Philanthropies has made a substantial financial contribution in support of accomplishing these objectives.

In Viet Nam the RS10 programme is led by the National Traffic Safety Committee (NTSC) and has a dual focus of reducing drinking and driving and increasing the use of good quality helmets among motorcyclists. Alcohol impairment is a major cause of road traffic injuries in Viet Nam, with an estimated 36% of those injured as a result of road traffic crashes exceeding the legal blood alcohol limit.

As Dr Graham Harrison, acting WHO Representative to Viet Nam explains, “The drink–driving programme in Viet Nam is based on international evidence which shows that legislation and enforcement, coupled with hard-hitting public awareness campaigns, can be extremely effective in reducing alcohol-related road deaths”. RS10 also aims to improve the quality of helmets being worn by motorcyclists: while helmet wearing rates in the country are high following the 2007 helmet law, the proportion of those wearing helmets meeting the national standard remains low, at about 20%, greatly reducing the potential to prevent traumatic brain injuries in the event of a crash.

Mr. Than Van Thanh – Chief Secretariat of the NTSC said, “RS10 has provided valuable financial and technical support, contributing to Viet Nam’s commitment to preventing drink-driving.”  “Preliminary results are very promising, showing small but significant reductions in road traffic fatalities and serious injuries in both Ha Nam and Ninh Binh provinces”.

Plans for 2012-2013 are to scale-up this effective programme, bringing technical and financial support to three additional provinces (Vinh Phuc, Quang Ninh and Bac Ninh).

Mayor Bloomberg has also provided crucial and strategic support to reduce tobacco use, a leading cause of preventable death in Viet Nam and a major risk factor for non communicable diseases like cardiovascular disease, stroke, cancer, emphysema and other respiratory ailments. The “Bloomberg Initiative”, which commenced in 2007, emphasizes six proven policies to reduce tobacco use (MPOWER)#. “Viet Nam is one of 15 low and middle income countries in this programme, selected for the un-enviable position of having the highest number of smokers” said Dr Harrison.  “Locally almost 50% of males smoke, exposing two-thirds of women and an estimated 50% of children to the harmful effects of second hand smoke.”

Support through the Bloomberg Initiative and its partners and grantees has resulted in an unprecedented acceleration of tobacco control advocacy for key measures that can reduce tobacco consumption including raising of prices and taxes, bans on in-door smoking and comprehensive bans on advertising, promotion and sponsorship of tobacco products.  It is widely perceived that the Bloomberg Initiative projects have effectively created new policy space as well as strong public support for tobacco control measures. “

The draft tobacco control law is anticipated to be finalized during the May 2012 session of the National Assembly.  “Once approved Viet Nam’s tobacco control law will set the scene for significant reductions in tobacco related harm,” said Dr Luong Ngoc Khue, the Director of the Standing Office of the Viet Nam Committee on Smoking and Health (VINACOSH).  “At the provincial level, a growing number of workplaces and public places are already becoming smoke-free, creating healthier work and public places in Viet Nam” he added.

 “WHO highly values the commitment and support of the Government and Mayor Bloomberg in tackling these major public health challenges.  We look forward to continuing our strong cooperation with national and provincial stakeholders to achieve our common goal of saving lives and preventing disability in Viet Nam” concluded Dr Harrison.

MPOWER#
Monitor tobacco use and prevention policies
Protect people from second-hand tobacco smoke,
Offer help to quit smoking,
Warn about the dangers of tobacco
Enforce ban on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship
Raise tax on tobacco products

-ENDS

WHO Media Contacts:
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Mobile: 0915 413 814

Spotlight

UNONE-101.jpg

Launch of UN Economic and Social Survey of Asia and the Pacific 2016

The Asia-Pacific region's journey towards a successful achievement of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development should be driven by broad-based productivity gains and further rebalancing towards domestic and regional demand, says the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) in its latest flagship publication. The Economic and Social Survey of Asia and the Pacific 2016 underlines that such a strategy will not only underpin revival of robust and resilient economic growth but will also improve the quality of this growth by making it more inclusive and sustainable.


logo_asia_pacific_gdrr.jpg

Asia-Pacific Regional Conference on Gender and Disaster Risk Reduction in Hanoi, Viet Nam


In light of the new framework on disaster risk reduction and changing contexts of the post-2015 development agenda, UN Women and Government of Viet Nam, in collaboration with UNISDR and UNDP, and with support from the Government of Japan is organizing an Asia-Pacific Regional Conference on Gender and Disaster Risk Reduction to mark one year of the adaptation of the Sendai Framework. The aim of the regional conference is to provide a forum for Governments, the civil society, the academia and UN agencies and other development partners to discuss how gender equality and women's participation can be integrated into targets, indicators and actions when developing implementation plans at regional, national and local levels.


ban-ki-moon.jpg

The Secretary-General’s message on International Women’s Day “From The Glass Ceiling To A Carpet Of Shards”

8 March 2016 - As a boy growing up in post-war Korea, I remember asking about a tradition I observed: women going into labour would leave their shoes at the threshold and then look back in fear. “They are wondering if they will ever step into those shoes again,” my mother explained.

More than a half-century later, the memory continues to haunt me. In poor parts of the world today, women still risk death in the process of giving life. Maternal mortality is one of many preventable perils. All too often, female babies are subjected to genital mutilation. Girls are attacked on their way to school. Women’s bodies are used as battlefields in wars. Widows are shunned and impoverished.


tom_event_390.jpg

72 hours to make the world better for children with disabilities

TOM (Tikkun Olam Makers) is an international non-profit organization using design and technology to address neglected problems. The TOM event is an intersection between challenges and technical solutions. Participants with different backgrounds and expertise gather together for a 72-hour “makeathon” and build a product to help someone in need. TOM focuses on inclusive designs with a reasonable price for people with disabilities. In Hebrew, Tikkun Olam means changing the world; and this is TOM’s mission. (See more information about TOM at www.tomglobal.org) Dead

In 2016, the United States Consulate General in Ho Chi Minh City, the Embassy of the State of Israel, UNICEF, Disability Research and Capacity Development (DRD), FABLAB Saigon, and other partners from academia and the private sector will co-organize the TOM event in Ho Chi Minh City. This is a unique opportunity for children with disabilities and families to present their challenges, as well as share ideas of products that would help to reduce their challenges. Based on these ideas, technical teams will develop innovative solutions during a 72-hour “makeathon” to help children have a better life.


ban-ki-moon.jpg

The Secretary-General’s message on Human Rights Day

 

10 December 2015 - Amid large-scale atrocities and widespread abuses across the world, Human Rights Day should rally more concerted global action to promote the timeless principles that we have collectively pledged to uphold.

In a year that marks the 70th anniversary of the United Nations, we can draw inspiration from the history of the modern human rights movement, which emerged from the Second World War.

At that time, President Franklin D. Roosevelt of the United States identified four basic freedoms as the birthright of all people: freedom of expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want and freedom from fear.  His wife, Eleanor Roosevelt, joined forces at the United Nations with human rights champions from around the world to enshrine these freedoms in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.



RSS Email Subscription

Enter your email address: